Morning fog on landing The railroad bridge across North Portland Harbor as viewed from the start of Saltzman Road in Forest Park. North Portland Harbor is a harbored section of the Columbia River a couple of miles south of the point where it meets its tributary, the Willamette. This is about as rare a sight in this part of the country right now as a White Rhino. At this point, I might even wager on the rhino. A desktop Charlie Brown Christmas tree looking out on a quiet neighborhood in the Pacific Northwest.
Merry Christmas to all my friends at Trover, both near and far. I hope yours is a warm and joyous day, and that the New Year brings you every measure of happiness you seek.
Buon Natale a tutti i miei amici a Trover, sia vicini che lontani. Spero che la festa sarà gioiosa e cordiale per voi, e che il Capodanno vi porterà ogni tipo di felicità che vi aspettate. We are all haunted by place names. They call to us from across the years and tinge the present with a rich and subtle color. There are no Hazel Nut trees in Hazel Dell anymore; no Salmon in Salmon Creek, and not an Orchard to speak of in Orchards or on Fruit Valley Road. These are all place names of neighborhoods in the Vancouver area. What you see if you go there now is not the pastoral and idyllic landscape of just a few short decades ago, but a sprawling tumble of sub-divisions and gated communities.
The farms which were once the lifeblood of the area, and sustained its economy through the century and a half since the western migration...well, those farms are gone. A few of them remain, here and there, particularly farther north, away from the cities of Vancouver and Portland. But the vast majority have been interred, paved over and converted to housing.
Every once and awhile, you'll find an old abandoned homestead, like the skeleton of an animal which has collapsed in the desert. And that's what brings it home. There were people here, working and thriving, breathing life into the land, building communities, raising families, fabricating the bits and pieces of a nation out of their struggle to survive -- all of them gone now.
For such a young country, we have been in an awful hurry to make our own history; and to remake it when it suits us, layering a new version like plaster over the old one.
But the place names are still there to haunt us, the risen spirit of that history that won't go away, and demands acknowledgement, respect, and admiration.
These are the firm and hardy roots of a nation that has flourished like no other. We may be under the illusion that we no longer have a use for them, but their place names tell us differently.
As we hurtle in our headlong rush into the future, let us not lose sight of where we've been, and hold onto -- like the treasure that it is -- the proud and humble legacy of our past.
Downy Woodpecker, the bright and diminutive star of yesterday's rather disappointing show. And here's the thing: you switch sides on a tree up here and everything looks different. You could bob in a kayak all day on that puddle in NZ and never pull off that trick.
(No offense to Kiwi's. Your island is on my bucket list.) What do I say? The boy likes his peanuts. Addiction can be a powerful thing. Built in 1940, the Arts building houses an eclectic mixture of small businesses; everything from lawyers' offices to a day spa. It's also the primary location of a fine, locally-owned coffee brewer: Gaia Java.
Just so you know, ivy grows on many of the buildings in downtown Vancouver, but on none with as spectacular an effect as this one.
#Architecture This is what passes for a sunset in the Pacific Northwest these days. There is technically a bit of sun in there, but it is being devoured by clouds.
With six months of drought in the rear-view mirror, nature has a lot of inundating to catch up on. Your Lake Wanaka gets all the publicity. But here in the Pacific Northwest, we have a few trees of our own. 1929 Travel Air B-4000 Downy Woodpecker teasing a larva out of an apple branch. An hour before sunset, down in the industrial district. The rain keeps coming, folks, and you only get a glimpse of sunlight for a couple of hours.
Might be time to head east of the Cascades to dry out for a bit. Cattle farm slips into the darkness at the southern edge of Vancouver. Vancouver's own version of the High Line (lite, folks, very lite) is known as the Land Bridge, a sweeping curve of concrete and steel that hangs over the start of State Highway 14 just east of town. It is part of Maya Lin's decade long Confluence project to link up 450 miles of the Lewis and Clark trail with a series of seven monuments.
It's a beautiful way to get from the famous Ft. Vancouver to the waterfront, and it's dotted with lots of artistic touches -- a great deal of them dedicated to the tribes of the Pacific Northwest.
This is one such installation, focused specifically on pre-Columbian trade and inter-tribal commerce. Another, similar structure appears on the north side, and a third circle was fixed just at the northern entrance, but was not completed.
The bridge has only been around since 2008, but it is has long-since become an extremely popular spot for runners, hikers and bikers.
It's also a very pleasant little walk on a sunny northwest day.
http://www.seattletimes.com/pacific-nw-magazine/vancouver-land-bridge-reconnects-a-river-to-a-people-a-past/
( #blue ) No longer a theater, this is now a gallery and the offices of Vancouver's Farmers Market.
But it has a storied past, and in 2017 will be 150 years old.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slocum_House_%28Vancouver,_Washington%29 Sun sets on a cattle farm at the southern edge of Vancouver. I'd be hard pressed to categorize myself as an interesting person. But I do have some interesting friends. This is Alice. She is a Chilean Rose Tarantula, or, officially a Rose Hair Tarantula (Grammostola rosea). She belongs to the woman who regularly cuts my hair, and who recently moved to the location which marginally qualifies this post as a Trover discovery.
Several years ago, Alice lost one of her front legs, the result of one too-curious cat finding its way into a room full of tarantula terrariums. The cat got as good as it gave and has not been curious about tarantulas since.
As you can see, Alice bears no sign of this injury. Over the course of three years, she gradually molted herself a new leg. Apparently, tarantulas regularly shed things like fangs and even the linings of internal organs, all of which grow back.
So all those urban legends about how arthropods would be the only living things to survive the earth's total devastation are not entirely without merit. Alice herself is likely to live at least 20 years, and noone knows for sure how much longer since her species has only been marketed as a pet for about that amount of time.
I wish her a long (and cat-free) life. Those of us who live in a certain neighborhood of the Lincoln district know that for one month every year we won't have to worry about turning on our porch lights. If the street lamps should fail, well, that's not really of any concern. Say the moon itself were to pop out of the sky and go flying into space. No big deal. Because for a glorious 30 days every winter, we're able to bask in the glow of a house lit bright enough to make artificial sunshine. A sight so startling, it causes commuters to back up traffic as they sit in their cars and gape.
It wasn't always that way. A few years back, the charming old couple who lives in the place started to put out a few lights to decorate their home. The next year they added a few more, and the year after that -- again -- some more. At some point, however, they seem to have developed a kind of high tolerance for luminescence. And when that happened, the floodgates were open. What you see in these photos is the early December version of what, by Christmas day, will be a kind of multi-colored solar flare emanating from the front yard of their home.
It can really be a beautiful thing to behold, as anyone who sees it for the first time can tell you. And those of us who live here have accepted with pride this red and gold meteor which appears in our midst during every gloomy Northwest December.
Can you blame us? We may be the only block on earth entirely visible from space.
#localgem The southern entrance, with a sculpture/gate by the artist Lillian Pitt, made of two cedar canoe paddles and includes a glass sculpture of a Chinook woman's face.
( #blue ) If you're a commuter in Southwest Washington or Northwest Oregon, this is the bane of your existence. The bridge across the Columbia River between Portland and Vancouver is actually a pair of vertical lift bridges, one built in 1917 and the other added in 1958. That's right. Apart from the regular patching and tweaking done to keep the things intact, there hasn't been any major renovation done to either bridge since the Eisenhower administration.
The bridges can be lifted almost arbitrarily, in some cases, because maritime traffic has a kind of imperial right-of-way that eclipses all other forms of transit. And when those bridges go up, some large portion of the nearly 50-100 thousand cars which pass over the thing each day come to a dead stop. Getting them going again is no small feat, either.
For close to a decade, several local, municipal and state governing bodies worked to More arctic light from the banks of the Columbia River. These covered walkways, with their perforated steel grills, won't protect you much from the rain. But they're welcome shade on a hot day, and flow beautifully along the length of the bridge.
( #blue ) Those of us who live in a certain neighborhood of the Lincoln district know that for one month every year we won't have to worry about turning on our porch lights. If the street lamps should fail, well, that's not really of any concern. Say the moon itself were to pop out of the sky and go flying into space. No big deal. Because for a glorious 30 days every winter, we're able to bask in the glow of a house lit bright enough to make artificial sunshine. A sight so startling, it causes commuters to back up traffic as they sit in their cars and gape.
It wasn't always that way. A few years back, the charming old couple who lives in the place started to put out a few lights to decorate their home. The next year they added a few more, and the year after that -- again -- some more. At some point, however, they seem to have developed a kind of high tolerance for luminescence. And when that happened, the floodgates were open. What you see in these photos is the early December version of what, by Christmas day, will be a kind of multi-colored solar flare emanating from the front yard of their home.
It can really be a beautiful thing to behold, as anyone who sees it for the first time can tell you. And those of us who live here have accepted with pride this red and gold meteor which appears in our midst during every gloomy Northwest December.
Can you blame us? We may be the only block on earth entirely visible from space.
#localgem Yesterday, I learned a valuable lesson. If you bombard Trover with what are essentially pictures of blue air, be prepared for the collective response to be something along the lines of The northern leg of the Land Bridge Trail. Here at the Arctic Circle...no, wait...we only seem to be getting the same amount of light as the Arctic Circle right now. We're actually a good deal south.
So, explain to me why this could be a photo taken at 11:30 in the morning?
Well, we'll take a rainless day, no matter how lugubrious it may actually be. This place has been serving food longer than my son has been eating it. And he just finished grad school. It was started by two sisters from Thailand, one a very likeable hostess who came to be the de-facto den mother of all West Vancouver Thai gourmands, and the other, a genius chef who made food that packed the place in at all hours of the day. But it fell on hard times about a decade ago, when the chef died and those left to cook seem to wander aimlessly through the backwaters of the cuisine. To keep the restaurant in the family, the remaining sister sold it to one of her nephews, a recent college grad who had what turned out to be a very effective plan to get it back on its feet. Today, it is as good as it has ever been, with an upscale menu that didn't come along with upscale prices, an admirable set of chefs (more than likely family), and a friendly staff who bend over backwards to accommodate you. One thing that hasn't changed is the warm, family atmosphere. If you sit down here, you won't feel as if you've entered a restaurant, but as if you've been invited into someone's home. Oh, and look, they're just about to put food on the table! The closest thing that comes to mind is the Italian trattoria, but I'm certain lots of countries have the same thing. If you're ever in Vancouver (USA), and you're a big fan of Thai Cuisine, do yourself a favor and stop by for chow. You won't be disappointed.
And make sure to ask for the window seat... A miserably wet day to have an alternator die out on the freeway, but the subsequent journey to the closest open mechanic deposited me next to this beautiful structure. Originally a First Christian Church, it was built in 1925 to house a thriving congregation which had outgrown its most recent house of worship. The building is now home to the unaffiliated Compass Church.
Even on a horribly grey day, the austere beauty of the place shines through.
http://ncbible.org/nwh/WaClark.html
And, yes, I love the #Architecture of the place. Glass trade bead necklaces crafted in the 18th and 19th centuries by Native American artists local to the Columbia River area.
The one on the far left contains mountain lion dew claws. The talking clocktower with the dancing salmon at Esther Short Park.
The cylindrical building in the background is a local landmark -- a set of apartments known as the Built in 1934 to house the first telephone exchange in the city of Vancouver, the building stood in place for over fifty years before it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic places in 1986. It is still very structurally sound, houses a set of offices, and is used every working day of the year. Most of what I can say about its history, design, and construction would simply be a repetition of the material you'll find in the referenced link.
What these documents won't tell you is the effect it will have, seeing it against the sharp blue sky a little over an hour before sunset. I have lived in this city for more than twenty-five years, and I am here to tell you, it was as if I was seeing it for the first time.
http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMJB4H_Vancouver_Telephone_Building_Vancouver_Washington
A fine example of art deco #Architecture in Vancouver, Washington. Those of us who live in a certain neighborhood of the Lincoln district know that for one month every year we won't have to worry about turning on our porch lights. If the street lamps should fail, well, that's not really of any concern. Say the moon itself were to pop out of the sky and go flying into space. No big deal. Because for a glorious 30 days every winter, we're able to bask in the glow of a house lit bright enough to make artificial sunshine. A sight so startling, it causes commuters to back up traffic as they sit in their cars and gape.
It wasn't always that way. A few years back, the charming old couple who lives in the place started to put out a few lights to decorate their home. The next year they added a few more, and the year after that -- again -- some more. At some point, however, they seem to have developed a kind of high tolerance for luminescence. And when that happened, the floodgates were open. What you see in these photos is the early December version of what, by Christmas day, will be a kind of multi-colored solar flare emanating from the front yard of their home.
It can really be a beautiful thing to behold, as anyone who sees it for the first time can tell you. And those of us who live here have accepted with pride this red and gold meteor which appears in our midst during every gloomy Northwest December.
Can you blame us? We may be the only block on earth entirely visible from space.
#localgem If you hustle down along the river bank looking for a place to shoot a perfect portrait of Mt. Hood, you'd think you'd be rewarded at almost every turn.
Fat chance. The shorefront property is almost all in private hands, commercial and or otherwise, and your camera may sit idle for a good long time if all you're looking for is an unobstructed view of Oregon's highest peak.
But if you put your mind to it, you might find something equally as interesting, and your intended target might just make a cameo if you frame it right.
Another view of the gateway at the northern entrance. If you've had a beer anywhere in Canada, Asia, South America or the United States since, say, 1934, chances are that the Great Western Malting Company has has something to do with it.
Hard to believe that a monstrous corporation such as this one should have had its humble beginnings in Vancouver, Washington. But back in 1935, that is exactly what happened.
Today, the flagship facility is going stronger than ever, driven by the micro-brewing movement, and bolstered by its status as only one of two malting plants in North America with direct access to the ocean.
It's an impressive facility, by any measure and, even at a distance from the city's center, it towers over everything in the area.
I've been trying hard to find a way to represent it in a way that gives you a sense of its grandeur. This is as good a place to start as any.
http://www.greatwesternmalting.com/great_western_malting
http://www.historylink.org/index.cfm?displaypage=output.cfm&file_id=9946 Beaded Gauntlet -- Unknown Plateau artist.
c. 1920 High-level specifications for three Curtiss aircraft.
Glenn Curtis worked for Alexander Graham Bell on a short-lived project called the Aerial Experiment Association. He moved on from there to design, build and sell motorcycle engines, a few of which found their way into pioneering aircraft built by other aviators.
Eager to get in on the action, Curtiss started designing planes, which eventually became a standard issue for government military and non-military contracts.
But Curtiss himself was no desk jockey. He purportedly made the first officially-witnessed flight (presumably in an heavier-than-air craft) in North America, is credited with the first long-distance flight in the U.S., and entered and won a race in the first international competition for aviators, the Grande Semaine d'Aviation aviation meeting at Reims, France, held in August 1909.
Curtiss's company eventually merged with Wright Aeronautical Corporation (that's right, those Wrights), to form the Curtiss-Wright Company, and entity which still exists to this day.
Truth be told, I never heard of the man, his aircraft, or his engines before my visit to the museum. But for about three decades in the early twentieth century, he and his company were the spruce-and-canvas predecessor to McDonnell-Douglas and Boeing.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glenn_Curtiss These birches never disappoint. Here they are today about a half an hour before sunset. Bells, buttons and beads used in Native American fabric art. The Clark County Historical museum features a rotating series of exhibits, though a large portion of its space is devoted to a semi-permanent display of Native American crafts.
This set of Kiowa women's moccasins date from 1900.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clark_County_Historical_Museum Some pieces are contemporary, and decidedly on the whimsical side.
This one is entitled Beaded Gauntlet -- Unknown Plateau artist.
c. 1920 This statue was on a riverfront walkway by The Beaches restuarant. It celebrates the thousands of women who worked in the shipyards during World War 2 A trio of birches that have been growing here for about 25 years. They're were nearly lost to an ice storm, and then to an infestation of insect larvae. But they're still going strong. I just love these birches in my neighborhood. They never disappoint. Ten years ago, this beautiful old house was a withering husk. The roof was sagging and supported with 2x4's, the interior was visible from the exterior, and looked as if a pair of cyclones had been playing badminton with it. The stonework was crumpled and shattered. And the cupola looked like a fallen cake. The family who owns it put it back together piece by piece. All by themselves. They're haven't finished yet, and may not be for a while. But, honestly, who would bet against them? Yesterday, I learned a valuable lesson. If you bombard Trover with what are essentially pictures of blue air, be prepared for the collective response to be something along the lines of OK, maybe an ultra-violet sky is worth a trove. The neighbors across the street looked long and hard at the crazy man taking pictures of their house in the dark. They've known me for a while, though, so it may not have struck them as odd as I think it did. Not sure that's a good thing Pearson Air Museum is located in one of the most historic sites in the Northwest. Learn about early aviation pioneers and the first trans Arctic flight by Russian aviator Valery Chkalov.
#Hometown #VancouverWA #PearsonAirMuseum Yesterday, I learned a valuable lesson. If you bombard Trover with what are essentially pictures of blue air, be prepared for the collective response to be something along the lines of Fall!!
#troveron #colorful The Pearson Air Museum is an aviation museum at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, USA. Managed by the National Park Service as part of the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, museum exhibits provide an opportunity for visitors to explore aviation history tied to Pearson Field and Vancouver Barracks. Objects and artifacts from the National Park Service collections and on loan from members of the community and other museums depict history of aviation in the Pacific Northwest Yes, we get over 150 days of rainfall a year. But, when the sun goes down, we also (sometimes) get this. We're used to rain here in the Great Northwest, particularly in the winter. The storms roll in from the north Pacific and generally lay siege to the place. They drive so hard from the south and west that they're able to shoulder out the cold, dry fronts coming in from the east as if they were made out of paper. But every once and awhile, the onshore flow crumples down and lets whatever blob of dry air that might be hovering over the Cascades come oozing through to exsanguinate the landscape. Then, for a couple of days, we bask in sunshine.
Inevitably, the process runs in reverse. And, as if to admonish us for all that smiling and good cheer, the rain comes back with a vengeance; usually on the tail end of some fiercesome front. The wind blows, people hug to their coats, cats fly around -- the whole region braces for a mighty battle between the forces of light and darkness. Kinda literally.
The good news for people who like to watch and record dramatic registers of color and light is that, for an ever-so brief period, the sky is a playground, and anyone with a camera is welcomed in. Yesterday, I learned a valuable lesson. If you bombard Trover with what are essentially pictures of blue air, be prepared for the collective response to be something along the lines of Lunch with a view. Clam strips were tasty.
#lifeatexpedia MB9 and Ham & Gouda Dutch Tacos in Portland, Oregon Good food, wonderful view
#lifeatexpedia
Yesterday, I learned a valuable lesson. If you bombard Trover with what are essentially pictures of blue air, be prepared for the collective response to be something along the lines of First sleeper cab. 1950 Freightliner.  Stop in at this good Italian cafe, deli and wine bar and watch people go by on main street of this quaint downtown. Everything homemade here, including breads, lemongrass pickles, chips, desserts. Free to tour this historic house, named for commander of the Vancouver barracks, also available to rent for events. #StunningStructures Walk through the working garden of flowers, herbs, fruits and vegetables in front of the Fort and step back in time by talking to the reenactors. Winter Boats
🌊🌊🌊⛵️ Boat of Discovery sculpture near the bridge on the Washington side of the Columbia River before crossing into Oregon. #roadtrip JUBITZ. Truck stop. Huge! In addition to tour of Fort, enjoy view from bastion of bridge over Columbia River between WA and OR. After touring the Fort, walk through a field where an archeological dig was in process, and see this monument and museum, highlighting one of USA'S oldest operating air fields. View exhibits of early military and civilian aviators here and about the site's WWI Spruce Mill. Vancouver, WA - Fort Vancouver Natl Historic Site - Fort - Chief Factor's Residence - Main Dining Room
This A beautiful little church which I pass by at least once a week. Finally got out of my car to take a picture. Truck stop eatery. And some replicas of transport trucks. Here a 1940 Ford. Marmon- Herrington dump truck. Vancouver, WA - Fort Vancouver Natl Historic Site
This Vancouver, WA - Fort Vancouver Natl Historic Site - Fort Garden
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Get an overview of this hotel3-star riverfront hotel near Portland International Raceway

Popular property highlights

Breakfast included
Free self parking
Free WiFi
Pets allowed
Restaurant

Location

Situated near the airport, this hotel is within 3 mi (5 km) of Portland Expo Center, Portland Meadows Racetrack, and Portland International Raceway. Vancouver Farmers Market and Fort Vancouver National Historic Site are also within 3 mi (5 km).

Hotel Features

This smoke-free hotel features a restaurant, an indoor pool, and a 24-hour fitness center. Free buffet breakfast is provided, as well as free WiFi in public areas, free self parking, and a free airport shuttle. Additionally, a bar/lounge, a sauna, and a 24-hour business center are onsite.

Room Amenities

All 200 rooms provide conveniences like refrigerators and microwaves, plus free WiFi and flat-screen TVs with cable channels. Premium bedding, coffee makers, and free newspapers are among the other amenities available to guests.

Oxford Suites Portland - Jantzen Beach

Hotel Amenities

Hotel Amenities

In addition to an indoor pool, Oxford Suites Portland - Jantzen Beach provides a sauna and a 24-hour fitness center. The hotel offers a restaurant. A bar/lounge is on site where guests can unwind with a drink. Guests can enjoy a complimentary breakfast each morning as well as a complimentary manager's reception. Public areas are equipped with complimentary wired and wireless Internet access.

Business-related amenities at this 3-star property consist of a 24-hour business center and meeting rooms. Event facilities measuring 1350 square feet (125 square meters) include conference space. This business-friendly hotel also offers multilingual staff, gift shops/newsstands, and concierge services. A roundtrip airport shuttle is complimentary to guests at scheduled times. Onsite self parking is complimentary.

Oxford Suites Portland - Jantzen Beach is a smoke-free property.

  • Express check-in 
  • Bar/lounge 
  • Elevator/lift 
  • Free airport transportation 
  • Indoor pool 
  • 24-hour front desk 
  • Free breakfast 
  • Conference space 
  • Express check-out 
  • Meeting rooms 3 
  • Restaurant 
  • Year Built 1988 
  • Free self parking 
  • Steam room 
  • Dry cleaning/laundry service 
  • Free WiFi 
  • Sauna 
  • Free wired Internet 
  • Smoke-free property 
  • Safe-deposit box at front desk 
  • Conference space size (meters) - 125 
  • Free reception 
  • Luggage storage 
  • 24-hour business center 
  • Concierge services 
  • Conference space size (feet) - 1350 
  • Gift shops or newsstand 
  • Laundry facilities 
  • Total number of rooms - 200 
  • 24-hour fitness facilities 
  • Television in common areas 
  • Number of floors - 4 
  • Number of buildings/towers - 1 
  • Multilingual staff 
  • Fireplace in lobby 

Family Friendly Amenities

  • Indoor pool  
  • Free Wi-Fi  
  • Laundry facilities  
  • Refrigerator  
  • Microwave  

Internet

Available in all rooms: Free WiFi

Available in some public areas: Free WiFi , Free wired Internet

Parking

Free self parking

Room Amenities

  • Premium TV channels 
  • Premium bedding 
  • Blackout drapes/curtains 
  • Air conditioning 
  • Free newspaper 
  • Phone 
  • Free local calls 
  • Refrigerator 
  • Coffee/tea maker 
  • Microwave 
  • Private bathroom 
  • Hair dryer 
  • Shower/tub combination 
  • Cable TV service 
  • Iron/ironing board 
  • Desk 
  • Daily housekeeping 
  • Flat-panel TV 
  • Number of bathrooms -  
  • Connecting/adjoining rooms available 
  • Free WiFi 

Where to Eat

Guests are offered a complimentary buffet breakfast each morning. A complimentary manager's reception is offered each day.

Oxford Bistro - This restaurant serves dinner only. Guests can enjoy drinks at the bar.

Nearby Things to Do

Recreational amenities at the hotel include an indoor pool, a sauna, and a 24-hour fitness center.

The recreational activities listed below are available either on site or nearby; fees may apply.

  • Bicycle rentals nearby 
  • Water skiing nearby 
  • Golfing nearby 
  • Windsurfing nearby 

Accessibility

If you have requests for specific accessibility needs, please note them at check-out when you book your room.

  • Accessible bathroom 
  • Roll-in shower 
  • In-room accessibility 

Hotel Policies

Check-in

Check-in time starts at 4 PM

Check-in time ends at midnight

Minimum check-in age is 18

Special check-in instructions:

Airport shuttle service is available at scheduled times during limited hours. Contact the property in advance to get details.

Check-out

Check-out time is 11 AM

Payment types

Children and extra beds

  • Children are welcome.
  • Rollaway/extra beds are not available.

Pets

  • Pets allowed for an extra charge of USD 25 per pet, per stay, plus a deposit of USD 25.00 per stay
  • Dogs and cats only
  • 2 per room

You need to know

Extra-person charges may apply and vary depending on property policy.

Government-issued photo identification and a credit card are required at check-in for incidental charges.
Special requests are subject to availability upon check-in and may incur additional charges. Special requests cannot be guaranteed.
Service animals exempt from fees/restrictions
No rollaway/extra beds available

Fees

Optional extras

The following fees and deposits are charged by the property at time of service, check-in, or check-out.
  • Pet deposit: USD 25.00 per stay
  • Pet fee: USD 25 per pet, per stay
The above list may not be comprehensive. Fees and deposits may not include tax and are subject to change.

Hotel Name

  • Oxford Suites Jantzen
  • Oxford Suites Jantzen Beach
  • Oxford Suites Jantzen Beach Hotel
  • Oxford Suites Jantzen Beach Hotel Portland
  • Oxford Suites Portland Jantzen Beach
  • Oxford Hotel Portland
  • Oxford Suites Portland - Jantzen Beach Hotel Portland
  • Portland Oxford Hotel
  • Oxford Suites Portland Jantzen Beach Hotel

We should mention

This property offers transfers from the airport. Guests must contact the property with arrival details on arrival, using the contact information on the booking confirmation. The property has connecting/adjoining rooms, which are subject to availability and can be requested by contacting the property using the number on the booking confirmation.


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